1990 Steelers 35 vs Browns 0 (plus Marino Discussion)
Matthew Simon
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#31
07-05-2017, 03:51 PM

(07-04-2017, 09:37 AM)Crash Wrote: The rumors about Marino were all over the city of Pittsburgh BEFORE he even played his lackluster senior season at PITT.  

Some still say it's true.  Someone even admitted on Twitter recently that he did coke WITH Marino, and even said where they did it.  

It wouldn't shock me if he dabbled in it, but constant use?  No way. Too much to lose and his Dad would have kicked his ass.

Who said that on Twitter about Marino and coke? I tried looking for it, but my Google-fu has failed me.

I think Peter King said it best, about Marino's potential drug use in College:

"What are you going be like when you're 21 years old, and you're the BMOC? I mean, you're going to have a few beers, you know? You're going to do things."

He said it better than I could, and I'm pretty sure one of the "things" in that quote was probably referring to, was him dabbling in coke.
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ECboy
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#32
02-26-2018, 11:56 AM

Yeah man, I think you're in the minority lol.
Brister was an idiot and couldn't keep his emotions in check despite having a cannon for an arm and having good mobility.
He was basically a less accurate Brett Favre.
He managed to piece together a long career because he had that arm and as he got older he mellowed out a bit but he was nuts.
O'Donnell had the calm and the arm and Barry Foster.
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NFL2000
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#33
06-03-2018, 08:05 PM

This opinion is coming from a Raiders fan. I believe the Steelers would have won at least two Super Bowls in the 1980s or at the very worst made it back to the Super Bowl a couple of times. Chuck Noll would have gotten the running game that Dan Marino needed in order to keep defenses off balance. The Dolphins depended on the right arm of Dan Marino way too much.
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Mee
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#34
01-17-2019, 12:49 AM

The best way to describe this is: If Dan Marino would be been drafted by the Steelers, the Steelers would have had a 70s/80s very similar to the Patriots 2000s/2010s.
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mcmillenandwife
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#35
01-18-2019, 08:11 AM

(01-17-2019, 12:49 AM)Mee Wrote: The best way to describe this is: If Dan Marino would be been drafted by the Steelers, the Steelers would have had a 70s/80s very similar to the Patriots 2000s/2010s.

Agreed, the '83-'84 teams would've been VERY formidable with Marino under center. They were still very solid on defense and he would've been throwing to Stallworth and Lipps. 

The mid-90's would've been even stronger, I think, because the Steelers had truly top-flight talent all over their defensive roster, they had the best O-line in football, they had an incredible running game and they had some pretty legitimate threats at WR. 

It's a shame we can't get a do-over on the '83 draft.
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Garrett Garlits
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#36
01-22-2019, 02:04 AM

People act like Marino was an option for the Steelers at the time, but he wasn't. Noll was bound and determined to find the next Joe Greene, and he thought he had in Gabe Rivera. We'll never know, obviously, but he did some good things in the limited action he saw before his accident, and he was widely regarded as a player that was only going to get better, kind of like Ryan Shazier before he was hurt. It isn't like they drafted Joe Schmo from Kokomo.

As for the quarterback situation, there was a documentary about the '83 draft a while back, and it talked a bit about Marino and the Steelers. Noll loved Danny, but knew he'd never play as long Bradshaw was there, which he still was expected to be at the time of the draft. One reporter (it may have been Bill Hillgrove, but I'm not sure) said that drafting Marino would have been a quarterback controversy waiting to happen, since everyone in the city would have been yelling for the hometown kid the second Bradshaw had a bad game. Let's not even think about what would have happened to Stoudt or Malone, neither of whom had ever started regularly at the time . Besides, Malone in particular was supposed to be the total package at quarterback: an accurate passer, a runner with speed, and a cool head in the pocket. Unfortunately, once his knee was torn up he lost the first two, and the third wasn't enough for him to have a good career by itself.

Two other things to remember, quickly: First, Shula changed the offense for Danny in Miami, letting him wing it all over the yard almost from the first game he started. I'm not sure Noll, would have done that; Franco still had some gas left, and if he hadn't had his contract problems he might have played another two or three years here. Even if he'd left as he actually did, guys like Abercrombie, Pollard, and Earnest Jackson did what Noll wanted, which was control the ball and eat the clock. That was too much of a cornerstone of Noll's philosophy for him to abandon it, and he was much more stubborn about it than Shula (who shared the same philosophy) ever was.

Second, it's hard to fathom what kind of beating Marino would have taken from playing on artificial turf at Three Rivers eight games a year. He had enough jump in his legs at Pitt to get where he wanted to go running, but after a few years in the pros it was gone, and that was with playing at the Orange Bowl (a grass field, remember) and practicing in the Florida sunshine. Put him on the artificial turf at Three Rivers, make him practice in the cold and wet, give him two guaranteed road games a year on turf (Houston and Cincinnati), and there may still have been an O'Donnell era, since Danny's knees (if not his whole body) would most likely have been on the verge of giving out by the mid-nineties.

One thing I forgot to mention: I've heard the stories about The Chief taking his regrets about not drafting Marino to his grave, but that was mostly because he was a hometown kid whom the old man had gotten to know. He didn't want Danny badly enough to overrule his sons and order that he be drafted, which would have been way out of character for him and may have led to problems between him and the future Ambassador. Remember, he loved Bradshaw too, and Terry planned to play until he was forty before his elbow went out, which would have taken the team through at least 1987. (He turned forty just before the start of the '88 season.)
(This post was last modified: 01-22-2019, 02:23 AM by Garrett Garlits.)
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